Looking for female who wants to get paid

Added: Campbell Brumbaugh - Date: 15.08.2021 19:44 - Views: 35927 - Clicks: 7258

Around the world, finding a job is much tougher for women than it is for men. When women are employed, they tend to work in low-quality jobs in vulnerable conditions, and there is little improvement forecast in the near future. Explore this InfoStory to get the data behind the trends and learn more about the different barriers holding women back from decent work. When someone is employed or actively looking for employment, they are said to be participating in the labour force.

Women who want to work have a harder time finding a job than men. The freedom to work — by choice, in conditions of dignity, safety and fairness — is integral to human welfare. Guaranteeing that women have access to this right is an important end in itself. From an economic perspective, reducing gender gaps in labour force participation could substantially boost global GDP. The regions with the largest gender gaps would see huge growth benefits. Many developed countries would also see their average annual GDP growth increase, which is ificant during times of near-zero economic growth.

ILO and Gallup teamed up to ask women across the globe if they preferred to work in paid jobs, care for their families, or do both. However, this preference is heavily influenced by socio-economic constraints and pressure to conform to traditional gender roles. Gender roles and the pressures to conform to these roles for women vary across regions, religions and households. One way the pressure to conform manifests itself is through marital status. For instance, in developed and emerging economies, women who have a spouse or a partner are less likely to be employed in a paid job or be actively looking for one.

In developing countries the reverse is true: the economic necessity in the region gives all women little choice but to work despite their marital status. Across the board, both women and men report that the biggest barrier for women in paid work is the struggle to balance it with family responsibilities. In developing and emerging countries, the lack of safe and accessible transportation is the most challenging factor for the small percentage of women who report being affected by this.

All too often, women risk facing harassment and even sexual assault on their daily commute.

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Globally, the lack of affordable care for children or family members is an obstacle for women, both for those looking for a job and those in paid work. Many women reported that their immediate family disapproved of their decisions to work outside the home. The principle of equal remuneration for work of equal value must be protected in law and promoted in practice. Improved wage transparency and gender-neutral job evaluation can help achieve this end, in addition to strengthening existing systems such as minimum wages and collective bargaining.

Preconceptions about the value of certain types of work can be challenged through education, public outreach and job evaluation systems. Many countries have explicit legislation against gender discrimination and harassment at work. While important, this is not enough. Additional measures, such as effective remedies, dissuasive sanctions, specialized equality bodies and public awareness campaigns are key to eliminating discrimination. Many women and men lack access to adequate maternity protection, paid paternity and parental leave and other basic social protection measures.

Policy reforms should acknowledge that the bulk of unpaid family and household work is currently performed by women. Care professions — in which women are over-represented — have a long history of poor regulation and protection. Promoting decent work for care professionals, including domestic and migrant workers, is essential.

At the same time, over-reliance on unpaid care work should be reduced and redistributed through public services and social infrastructure development. Due to their increased likelihood of being in vulnerable or informal employment, women are disproportionately impacted by economic crises. Safeguards against the effects of economic downturns need to be complemented by gender-responsive policies, including efforts to formalize jobs in the informal economy. The data is clear: women want to be in paid employment, but a persistent set of socio-economic barriers keep them out of the workforce.

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Identifying and quantifying these barriers allows us to develop smarter policy responses for eliminating them. Ultimately, closing gender gaps in the labour force is not just good for women and their households, but for the global economy as a whole. This website uses cookies. For more information about these please. Share story. Close share menu Share. This section. This story. Twitter Facebook LinkedIn. Explore Introduction A global gap Unemployed or vulnerable Why does the gender gap matter?

In this story. Employment The gender gap in employment: What's holding women back? A global gap When someone is employed or actively looking for employment, they are said to be participating in the labour force. Explore the gender gap by country.

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Unemployed or vulnerable Women who want to work have a harder time finding a job than men. Explore the unemployment gap by country. What does vulnerable employment look like? Why does the gender gap matter? The growth benefits of reducing gender gaps. What women want ILO and Gallup teamed up to ask women across the globe if they preferred to work in paid jobs, care for their families, or do both.

How do people feel about women and work? What do people think in your country? Persistent challenges. Gender roles Work-family balance Lack of transport Lack of affordable care Gender roles Gender roles and the pressures to conform to these roles for women vary across regions, religions and households.

Work-family balance Across the board, both women and men report that the biggest barrier for women in paid work is the struggle to balance it with family responsibilities. Lack of transport In developing and emerging countries, the lack of safe and accessible transportation is the most challenging factor for the small percentage of women who report being affected by this. Lack of affordable care Globally, the lack of affordable care for children or family members is an obstacle for women, both for those looking for a job and those in paid work.

Breaking barriers: the story of a Palestinian businesswoman. Bridging the gap. Achieve equal pay.

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Tackle occupational segregation. Eliminate discrimination. Promote work—family balance. Create quality care jobs. Guard against downturns. Smarter solutions The data is clear: women want to be in paid employment, but a persistent set of socio-economic barriers keep them out of the workforce.

Read the full report on trends for women. Read the full report on global perceptions about women at work. More Stories. Making decent work a reality for domestic workers Explore InfoStory.

Looking for female who wants to get paid

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